Category Archives: Food for Thought

Surviving the (Current) Zombie Apocalypse

In the previous post of this series, I revealed why we are already in the midst of a zombie apocalypse.  Enough of the madness!  It’s time to arm yourself with strategies to survive and thrive in the modern world.

1.  Avoid Mindless Eating

This is a great tool I got from my good friend and fellow coach Nate Miller.  Before each meal, try practicing this mindfulness routine -

  • Why am I eating?
  • Is it making me healthy, or is it making me sick?
  • Is it worth it?

OWN your decisions, and begin to understand your motivations for those decisions.  Brain de-zombified!

2.  Remove Environmental Toxins

We need to think about our food as a part of our environment.  Our environment modifies our genes, our phenotype, and can exacerbate autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions.  Your mission – eliminate grains, legumes, sugar, dairy, and alcohol for 4 weeks.  Add them back and see how you look, feel, and perform.  Health de-zombified!

3.  Reset Your Biorhythms Continue reading

A Simple Trick to Improve the Efficiency of Practice and Reach Your Goals

Freefitguy Handstand

I finally had a chance to sit down and read “The Practicing Mind” by Thomas Sterner while on a plane to Ireland.  This is part of a kick I’ve been on recently on how to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of practice.  Not only do I want to improve my ability to learn new skills quickly, I want to be a more effective coach as well.  I only get to work with people three hours a week, max.  It is super important that these sessions be as successful as possible, and that the new movement patterns “stick” with clients long outside their time with me.

Though there are several lessons to be learned from this book, the one that stuck with me the most is this:  Maintain your focus on practice in the moment, not comparing yourself to your end goal.  This produces short-term satisfaction and long-term success.

Searching for Bobby Handstand

I saw immediate feedback with my quest to master the handstand.  I realized that I was falling into the trap of wanting the handstand so badly, that my practice suffered.  Every day was a failure because I hadn’t reached my end goal – a solid freestanding handstand.  As soon as I switched my goal from “I want to do a handstand” to “I am going to practice a handstand for 5 minutes today”, my practice sessions took off.  Now, every time I spent 5 minutes working on a handstand, I was a success. Continue reading

The Zombie Apocalypse Is Here!

The first time someone sees a MovNat practice session (jumping, climbing, crawling, etc.), they’ll often joke that it looks like I’m training for the Zombie Apocalypse.  I’m all for this comparison, because it starts a conversation.  I explain the real world application of these skills, and how it’s not only fun but keeps me strong and healthy.  They usually nod their head in agreement, but I can tell they feel like it’s so far removed from what they’d ever have to do that it’s almost fantastical.  Sure, it’s great and all to train for the oncoming Zombie hoards, but how can that help me NOW?

Walking out of Kroger the other day, an epiphany smacked into my brain space – the Zombie Apocalypse is already here!  But before you grab your crossbows and head underground with a drum full of coconut oil and as many Primal Pacs as you can muster, let me explain.

In the classic zombie tale, we fear the end of the world coming through some sort of transmittable disease that renders us mindless; decaying bodies barely holding together as we limp around the countryside in search of our next meal.  Isn’t this remarkably similar to what’s happening right now? Continue reading

How to Integrate MovNat Into Your Strength and Conditioning Routine

To build your own MovNat program, it’s important to understand the relationship between conditioning and skill acquisition.  Far from being mutually exclusive, your current strength and conditioning program can absolutely feed into a rich natural movement practice.  The key is progression – a relationship I call the skill-conditioning continuum.

Conditioning-Skill Continuum Arc

Gray Cook writes in his book “Movement” that we should never add strength to a movement dysfunction.  This sentiment is echoed in MovNat’s philosophy – you will gain conditioning through training movement skills, but not necessarily the other way around. Continue reading

My Training

Hey all!  Today I’d like to post a piece I did for my gym newsletter.  It details my daily routine, training goals, nutrition, programming, etc.  I thought it would be a good resource to put on the blog.  I hope you enjoy it!

Tell us what you are trying to accomplish with your training and nutrition right now.  What are your goals? 

My goals are multi-layered.  First and foremost, I train (and eat) to be healthy, vital, and expand my boundaries.  This is why I will continue to train for the rest of my life.

Second, I train to be strong so that I may help others.  What is strength if I cannot use it to benefit those around me?  The results aren’t only physical – I train for inner-strength that comes from dedication, perseverance, and confidence as well.

Third, I train for fun.  For me, this means exploring how my body can move and acquiring new movement skills.  I train natural human movements ALA MovNat.  In my current program, I’m focusing on hand balancing, explosive jumping, and the ability to safely roll out of a fall.  If you’re training isn’t fun, what’s the point?  As Alwyn Cosgrove states in his first three rules of lifting:  “1.  Do something.  2.  Do something you love.  3.  The rest is just details.”

Why did you choose this goal?  What motivated you?  Continue reading